You Are Here: Home > Cancer 101 > Early Cancer Detection

Early Cancer Detection

There are tests that aid in early detection for some cancers. Most tests are recommended beginning between age 40 and 50 and should be repeated every one to three years.

Get screened regularly for these cancers:

  • Colon/rectum:
  • Tests include the This test checks for blood in the stool through small samples that are placed on special cards and sent to a doctor or laboratory for testing. Blood in the stool may be a sign of colorectal cancer. Fecal occult blood test, Examination of the lower colon using a sigmoidoscope inserted into the rectum. A sigmoidoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. The equipment may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease. Sigmoidoscopy, and Examination of the inside of the colon using a colonoscope inserted into the rectum. A colonoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. The equipment may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease. Colonoscopy.

  • Breast:
  • The standard screening test is a mammogram (X-ray of the breast tissue).

  • Cervix:
  • The standard screening test is the A procedure in which cells are scraped from the cervix for examination under a microscope used to detect cancer and changes that may lead to cancer. A Pap smear can also show conditions that are not cancer such as infection or inflammation. Pap smear.

Guidelines for when testing should begin and how often it should occur may be different for each person, so talk with your doctor about what's right for you.

Although there are other early detection tests and screens available for other cancers, they carry even more risks for false positive and negative results than the tests listed above.


 
Personalized Medicine
   
Recently Diagnosed
 
Cancer 101
Survivorship
 
Research
 
Advocacy
 
Inspiration
 
Resources
 
 
 
 
 
 

Your doctor may suggest other screens.

Many cancer treatments are more effective and less invasive when administered earlier in the disease process.

With early detection, individuals also become more informed about their health status.

People with knowledge about a health concern are then able to proactively strive toward greater wellness by making changes to improve their health.

 

 
CISN Tips:
  • Get screened

  • Get to know your body, when something seems not quite right – pay attention and take your concern to your doctor. You must be your own advocate at the doctor's office - request tests.

 

Groups that provide information about screening test guidelines are: the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, as well as non-profits focused on disease specific cancers.

Please check the CISN Resources Links section to find organizations pertaining to your disease.

For More Information

American Institute for Cancer Research

www.aicr.org

American Cancer Society

www.cancer.org

Center for Advancement in Cancer Education

www.beatcancer.org

Collaborative for Health and the Environment

www.healthandenvironment.org

Lance Armstrong Foundation

www.livestrong.org

National Cancer Institute

www.cancer.gov

People Living With Cancer

www.plwc.org

World Health Organization

www.who.org

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Site Design by: Studio457
 
CISN Home Page About Us Services CISN Home Page Contact Site Map CISN Home Page CISN Home Page